History of Sign Language

Now I would like to show you the history of the American Sign Language.

Somewhere in the sixteenth Century- Geronimo Cardano, a physician of Padua, in northern Italy, proclaimed that deaf people could be taught to understand written combinations of symbols by associating them with the thing they represented.

1620- Juan Pablo de Bonet published the first book on teaching sign language to deaf people that contained the manual alphabet.

1755- Abbe Charles Michel de L’Epee of Paris founded the first free school for deaf people. He taught that deaf people could develop communication with themselves and the hearing world through a system of conventional gestures, hand signs, and fingerspelling. He created and demonstrated a language of signs whereby each would be a symbol that suggested the concept desired.

1778- Samuel Heinicke established the first public school for deaf people that achieved government recognition. He taught the method of speech and speechreading.

1817- Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet founded the nation’s first school for deaf people, in Hartford, Connecticut, and Laurent Clerc became the United States’ first deaf sign language teacher.

1863- By now 22 schools for deaf people were established throughout the United States.

1864- Gallaudet College, in Washington, D.C., was founded. It now remains to be the only liberal arts college for deaf’ people in the United States and the world.

Now it is the 4th used language in the United States.

Information was received from “The Perigee Visual Dictionary of Signing” by Rod R. Butterworth and Mickey Flodin: link

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Comments

  • granttrotter  On April 10, 2011 at 9:44 pm

    This is interesting. I wouldn’t think it would require a physician to make a proclamation that deaf people could be taught to understand written combinations of symbols by associating them with the thing they represented.

    I’m very surprised that sign language is the fourth-most used language in the United States. After thinking about it, it makes sense because many deaf people may be in places where things are made practical for them, such as Gallaudet College. Another factor is that there aren’t necessarily any visual cues that they’re deaf.

    Thought-provoking stuff!

  • Language  On January 6, 2015 at 7:09 pm

    It’s actually a great and helpful piece of information. I’m glad that you shared this helpful information with us.
    Please stay us informed like this. Thanks for sharing.

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